National Week 2012

Become a Guided Inquiry Design Practitioner

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Become a Guided Inquiry Design Practitioner

"How can students learn to think for themselves, make good decisions, develop expertise, and become lifelong learners in a rapidly changing information environment? How can students learn, create, and find meaning from multiple sources of information? These are fundamental questions facing educators in designing schools for 21st-century learners. Guided inquiry is a practical way of implementing an inquiry approach that addresses these 21st-century learning needs for students." Kuhlthau, C. & Maniotes, L. 2010.

The Guided Inquiry process

By introducing the Guided Inquiry process as a whole school inquiry model, teachers and students can explore the world through inquiry across a range of discipline areas using a common inquiry process, which consists of eight phases: Open, Immerse, Explore, Identify, Gather, Create, Share, and Evaluate.

According to the authors of Guided Inquiry Design (Kuhlthau, Maniotes & Caspari, 2013), employing a GI approach helps students “gain deep understanding of curriculum content and also internalize an inquiry process that they can use in academic settings, the work world, and everyday life as they apply the same inquiry strategies” (Ch.1, para 1), and by “consistently learning through the phases of the Guided Inquiry process, students gain competence and independence for taking responsibility for their own learning process” (Ch. 12). This also ensures that teachers within a school use a common language of inquiry to assist students in making their own connections between what they have learned through inquiry in content area with other content areas, and from grade to grade as they progress through school.

Building Guided Inquiry teams

For this approach to successfully ‘guide inquiry’ as a way of learning across content areas and grade levels, schools need to have established a collaborative culture that encourages instructional teaming. It requires the building of collaborative teaching partnerships between classroom teachers and specialist teachers, such as the school library media specialist or teacher librarian, the reading/literacy teacher, the elearning facilitator, English Language Learner (EEL) teacher, and career/technical education(CTE) teachers. The configuration of each instructional team is dependent upon the scope of the inquiry unit, the disciplinary expertise of the classroom teacher, and the learning needs of the students. For example, a teacher might team with the school library media specialist, ICT teacher, and specialist drama teacher to design a guided inquiry unit where students work in groups to complete a Visual and Performing Arts project.

Guided Inquiry involves “close supervision, ongoing assessment, and targeted intervention by the instructional team… through the inquiry process that gradually leads students toward independent learning” (Kuhlthau, Maniotes & Caspari, 2007, p. 3). This scaffolding needs to be developed as part of curriculum unit design. The expertise and roles of each of the instructional team also need to be clearly defined as part of design process.

Teacher-Scool Library Media partnerships are essential in making Guided Inquiry happen

Studies examining the impact of school libraries on student achievement have shown when school library media specialists (SLMS) collaboratively plan, teach and evaluate with classroom teachers, students learn more, get better grades, and score higher on standardised test scores than those students without access to the resourcing and instructional expertise of a SLMS (Kahn & Valence, 2012; Montiel-Overall, 2008; School Libraries Worldwide, 2008; Todd, 2008a, 2008b; Lance, Rodney & Russell, 2007; Haycock, 2007; Lance, Rodney & Hamilton-Pennell, 2005; Lindsay, 2005).

Classroom teachers benefit from this collaboration because team teaching reduces the teacher/student ratio in a class, and allows greater opportunity to provide individualised instruction for each student each lesson. This instructional partnership also provides greater support for at-risk students (Gavigan & Kurtts, 2010). Furthermore, recent studies have identified the important role the school library media specialist plays in supporting the development of teachers’ and students’ digital literacy skills (Lance & Schwarz, 2012; Todd, Gordon & Lu, 2011; Duke & Ward, 2009; Asselin, & Dorion, 2008). 

Getting Started!

Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K., & Caspari, A.K. (2012). 

Building Guided Inquiry Teams for 21st Century Learners by Carol C. Kuhlthau and Leslie K. Maniotes.

Guided Inquiry Design Webinars producted by ABC-Clio

Connect on Social Media:

Google+: Guided Inquiry Design Community

Facebook: Guided Inquiry Design

These communities support the practice of learning through inquiry in schools. Guided Inquiry Design is an approach that can be used to support problem-based learning, integrated studies, project-based learning, cooperative learning, schools implementing the CCSS and more... By connecting you will be able to share strategies, ideas and support one another to meet the needs of learners in schools across the globe today.

Examples of Guided Inquiry Design from around the world have shown us that students learning through this approach are highly engaged, enjoy learning and look forward to coming to school. Do you too believe that ALL kids deserve to learn in that kind of environment? Join us!


Guided Inquiry Design Resources and Posters:

Syba Signs is a leading provider of specialist school library resources, we have just released an exciting series of professionally designed, companion resources for Guided Inquiry Design for school libraries.  Modern, bright and inspiring, these resources will assist you to reinforce the Guided Inquiry Design concepts and assist students with their learning in your library.

View Resources

Shout it out! I'm a Guided Inquiry Design Practitioner!

We encourage you to promote yourself as a Guided Inquiry Design Practitioner. Embed the following badge on your blog, website or CV to let colleagues and potential employers know you are a Guided Inquiry Design practitioner.

Please include attribution to sybasigns.com & Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K., & Caspari, A.K. (2012). Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. (Kindle ed.). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. with this graphic.



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Syba Academy



References

Asselin, M., & Dorion, R. (2008). Towards a transformative pedagogy for school libraries 2.0. School Libraries Worldwide, 14(2), 1-18.

Duke, T. S. & Ward, J. D. (2009). Preparing information literate teachers: A metasynthesis. Library & Information Science Research, 31, 247-256.

Gavigan, K., & Kurtts, S. (2010). Together we can: Collaborating to meet the needs of at-risk students. Library Media Connection, (Nov/Dec), 10-12. Retrieved from http://www.librarymediaconnection.com/pdf/lmc/reviews_and_articles/featured_articles/
Gavigan,%20Kurtts_November
_December2010.pdf

Haycock, K. (2007). Collaboration: Critical success factors for student learning. School Libraries Worldwide, 13(1), 25-35.

Kahn, E., & Valence, L. (2012). Collaboration is the key to successful research. Library Media Connection, (March/April), 40-42.

Retrieved from http://www.librarymediaconnection.com/pdf/lmc/reviews_and_articles/featured_articles/
Kahn_March_April2012.pdf

Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K., & Caspari, A.K. (2007). Guided inquiry: Learning in the 21st century. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.

Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K. (2010). Building Guided Inquiry Teams for 21st-Century Learners. School Library Monthly. Retrieved from
http://www.schoollibrarymonthly.com/articles/kuhlthau&maniotes2010-v26n5p18.html

Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K., & Caspari, A.K. (2012). Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. (Kindle ed.). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Lance, K.C., & Schwarz, B. (2012). How Pennsylvania school libraries pay off: Investments in student achievement and academic standards. PA School Library Project. HSLC, Oct. 2012. Web. 1 June 2013. http://paschoollibraryproject.org/research

Lance, K.C., Rodney, M.J., & Hamilton-Pennell, C. (2005). Powerful libraries make powerful learners: The Illinois Study. Canton, IL: Illinois School Library Media Association. Retrieved from http://www.islma.org/pdf/ILStudy2.pdf

Lance, K.C., Rodney, M.J., & Russell, B. (2007). How students, teachers, and principals benefit from strong school libraries: The Indiana Study. Indianapolis, IN: Association for Indiana Media Educators.

Lindsay, K. (2005). Teacher/teacher-librarian collaboration: A review of the literature. School Libraries in Canada, 25(2), 8-21.

Montiel-Overall, P. (2008). Teacher and librarian collaboration: A qualitative study. Library and Information Science Research, 30(20), 145-155.

School libraries work! (2008). (3rd ed.). New York: Scholastic Library Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.scholastic.com/content/collateral_resources/pdf/s/slw3_2008.pdf

Todd, R. (2008a). The dynamics of classroom teacher and teacher librarian instructional collaborations. Scan, 27(2), 19-28.

Todd, R. (2008b). Youth and their virtual networked worlds: Research findings and implications for school libraries. School Libraries Worldwide, 14(2), 19-34.

Todd, R. J., Gordon, C. A., & Lu, Y. L. (2011). One common goal: Student learning, Phase 2. New Brunswick, NJ: Center for International Scholarship in School Libraries. Retrieved from http://cissl.rutgers.edu/images/stories/docs/njasl_phase%20_2_final.pdf

Woolls, B. (2008). The school library media manager. (4th ed.). Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.

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